Winter Workshop

WORKSHOPS WITH WILMA WINTER 2019

KNOW YOUR ANCESTORS CANMORE - 4 Sessions
Wednesday 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th March 2019 Arts Place

Create stories to enrich future
generations. Bring photos, letters, artefacts or stories to help you explore,
reflect and write about your place in the history of your family. Imaginative
exercises and meditations will enable you to glean the wisdom and legacy of
your ancestry.


Calgary Board of Education - Chinook Learning Services

Managing Workplace Emotions
You can't change conflict and opposing points of view in the workplace. You can, however, change the way you react. Become more emotionally aware, harness your emotions and express them positively with control, confidence and composure.
Friday 1st March 2019 12.30pm -3.30pm

Conflict Resolution for the Workplace
Successful conflict resolvers are not born; they are trained. Build your skills as an effective conflict resolver and mediator. Learn to recognize conflict patterns and what triggers and escalates conflict in others, master strategies that reduce conflict escalation, assert yourself confidently and give constructive feedback. These skills will help you work more productively and harmoniously with clients, colleagues and superiors. See Course Outline.
Instructor: Wilma Rubens - see Instructor Profile

Fridays 8th and 15th March 2019 9.00 - 3.30pm

My story straw to gold
We live our life forwards, yet read it backwards. Discover the unique story that your life makes as you reflect on where your desires, struggles, and insights have taken you. Learn to use free-fall writing, guided meditation, and discussion to put your conflicts into a bigger picture and see yourself as the hero/heroine in your own wandering journey even as it is happening. No previous writing experience is necessary.
Read Course Reviews. Instructor: Wilma Rubens - see Instructor Profile
http://www.chinooklearningservices.com/

Entangled Enchantments

Entangled Enchantments
My very first collection of poetry. These poems celebrate my journey on the uncharted waters of the feminine. For your very own copy purchase at Cafe Books, Canmore, or Pages in Kensington, Calgary or contact www.wilmarubens.com

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

From Buddha to Beethoven

“The only way to live is to accept each minute as an unrepeatable miracle.”
-- Storm Jameson

The summer solstice by the Bow River. Are the birds singing their one song or their consolation song? In my mind it is not a consolation song but a summer song of verve and vitality. I don’t suppose a bird stops to think about his or her voice wondering if it is good enough, worthy enough or melodic enough. No, I imagine birds awaken as the first morning blush chases away the darkness and sing, not for their breakfast or their supper but just because they are alive.

I was thinking that today as I cycled around Lake Minewanka loop feeling full of life, inhaling the fresh aromas of summer, the green energy of the pine trees, aspens and grass. “I am here now in this moment, with no guarantee of what the futures holds but knowing this is enough.”

Now I guess that is truly what the Buddha was trying to tell us. The problem I have with him is he had his eyes closed, focusing on his inner world. It feels to me that he was closing out the wonders of being alive on this blue green planet spinning through the galaxy at some mind-boggling speed. At this time of the year I want to keep my eyes, ears and nose wide open to embrace the shinning sage waters rushing through the log jam, the song birds, blue butterflies, sweet smelling wolf willow, delicate five petaled flowers with yellow centres and the slipper orchid. Can there be anything more precious than the astounding Alberta wildflowers?

That brings me to Beethoven. I watched a movie called “Copying Beethoven.” He walked in places like this, by rivers and forests listening to their magic. Then at home, using his dazzling creativity he wrote brilliant Symphonies. Flutes, violins and drums echoed the sounds he heard in the environment. The amazing thing is he remembered nature’s wild melodies after he went deaf. With his ears shut off to the external world he tuned into the sounds of his delicious inner world and continued to produce harmonious compositions that he was never able to hear.

While the Buddha left a heritage of verbal teachings, Beethoven left a legacy of musical masterpieces all inspired by the natural world.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Photos below

OK I am still challenged by my blogging skills. The photos in the last post are from a backcountry ski trip to Socerer Lodge in British Columbia.
The bottom on is Jeanie McBroom up on the ridge behind Amsikwi - just for the record it was about minus twenty.




Hamecoming

Hamecoming

Deep roots nurtured by the weeping willow
Fresh western air on Arran’s blond beaches
Striding over Goatfell’s granite ridges
Strengthened my curiosity my wanderlust

As a teen I poured over Beautiful British Columbia Magazines
For geography class made an album of far-off New Zealand
Spent hours under the flouted columns on Carlton Hill
Mesmerized by the green orange hills of Fife
Wondered what lay across the North Sea
As I yearned for exotic lands and cultures

Once launched from the stern walls of Edinburgh University
I a rebellious daughter of patriarchy travelled
before long my passport stamped full
my photo albums like pages of the National Geographic
In a sea of other I stumbled on a forlorn inner place
A longing for home

While I scaled mountains in strange lands,
The world arrived in Scotland
The white mainstream Scotland of my youth
Has morphed into a rainbow blend
Second generation Asian speak with Scottish brogue

At sixty I am woman who has come hame to herself
Found my inner place an expanding pool of light
My roots have suckered across continents
And intertwined with the global community
In an intricate Celtic Knot.